Baby Names Inspired by Classic Literature

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While many expecting parents choose a baby name from a baby name book, book lovers have been known to choose the name of a beloved literary character.

Take a look at our top baby names inspired by classic literature:

Girl names inspired by classic literature

Charlotte: The wise, beloved spider of E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web.

Estella: The icy object of affection of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations.

Jane: The brave heroine of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre.

Josephine: The independent, spirited sister with big dreams of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women.

Catherine: The wildly selfish love interest of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights.

Annika: Friend and neighbor of the wildly adventurous Pippi Longstocking in Astrid Lindgren’s novel of the same name.

Mayella: Wrongful accuser of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

Elinor: The sensible sister of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility.

Scarlett: The self-centered Southern belle of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind.

Boy names inspired by classic literature

Heathcliff: Heartsore main character of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights.

Amory: The mildly egocentric protagonist of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise.

Holden: The resentful, depressed teenage protagonist of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.

Pip: The passive, obsessive main character of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations.

Rhett: The rogue antagonist of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind.

Atticus: The moral widowed attorney of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

Bennet: The last name of the struggling family in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.

Earnest: Name assumed by title character Jack Worthing in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest.

Oliver: Orphaned protagonist of Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist.

Gender-neutral names inspired by classic literature

Sawyer: Last name of the free-spirited main character of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Scout: The strong-willed tomboy of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

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